What is Threatening Your Teen’s Oral Health?

Preventative Dentistry Austin TX Recent research has a lot to tell us about the risks that may affect young people’s smiles. During early childhood, there is a focus on teaching young ones to care for their teeth and gums. Parents do what they can to demonstrate, then encourage and motivate, and also to support their children by taking them to the dentist twice a year. As young children transition into their teen years, life often changes significantly. According to the Academy of General Dentistry, these changes can permanently affect teens’ oral health.

Many parents imagine that the most apparent threat to their children’s teeth is the lack of brushing and flossing that may be going on. Clearly, brushing and flossing are vital to oral health. For many teens, these practices may be forgotten in the midst of homework and sports and friends and jobs. One of the biggest tips we offer teens and their parents is to maintain brushing and flossing habits, as they protect teeth and can also prevent bad breath. But there’s more.

How Lifestyle Affects Teens’ Mouths

With the average teen being extraordinarily busy, there are bound to be repercussions. One that has recently come to light is the prevalence of poor diet among the teenage population. It may not seem like a big deal for teens to enjoy soda with lunch, or to guzzle a sports drink after an intense practice. It is, though. It turns out, these beverages contain acidic ingredients that eat away healthy enamel. The prevalence of soda and sports drink consumption has coincided with an increase in cases of tooth erosion. What is important to know about erosion is that enamel does not grow back. Many teens who consume large amounts of soda suffer long-term consequences such as susceptibility to decay and fractures. And there’s more.

The acidic ingredients found in soda and sports drinks have also been associated with calcium depletion. This is a concerning problem among teens because bone grown is most active from age 9 to age 18. By standing in the way of calcium absorption, common beverages have been shown to increase risks of tooth damage as well as bone fractures, especially among teen girls.

Let’s Work Together

We believe in working with our patients to support long-term oral health. In addition to providing relevant information, we provide quality care in a calm, friendly environment. Schedule your family’s care at Hills Dental Spa by calling our Austin office at (512) 347-0044.

Posted in: Dental Hygiene, General Health

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